Extreme Encryption and the U.S. Government

100000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
= approximate number of particles in universe

100000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
= count of a tiny subset of unique algorithms in Extreme Encryption

  1. Extreme Encryption: claims too strong?:
  2. Extreme Encryption: a tool too strong?:
  3. Government involvement:
  4. May 2019:
  5. Contact us:
  6. Our elevator speech:

Extreme Encryption™: Are the claims too strong?

Marpex Inc. claims that its Extreme Encryption™, properly used, cannot be breached through brute force attack by any of the United States' adversaries in our ongoing cyberwarfare. Marpex Inc. further claims that Extreme Encryption™ solves for decades to come the threat posed by hacking based on the use of quantum computing.

 

These claims could be simply the musings of a workaholic GPS (Geriatric Problem Solver) from Upper Appalachia who has ventured out of his career path into an area beyond his competencies. If that is so, all this verbiage about Extreme Encryption™ can be safely ignored.

 

Pause for a moment to consider the mere abstract possibility that there is some truth in these claims. What if China's People's Liberation Army cannot break files and messages encrypted with our single use algorithms? What if computational infeasibility has actually arrived full scale, from nowhere? (Can any good thing come out of Steubenville, Ohio?) What if the technology actually does permit scaling upward to overcome anything that quantum computing can throw at us for the next several decades?

 

Extreme Encryption™: Alternatively, is this security tool too strong?

If the claims are true, then might Extreme Encryption™ be too strong? Industrial strength encryption, such as Marpx Privacy Plus™ is not insuperable to the National Security Agency. High entropy combined with a requirement to try 3,521,614,606,208 (three and a half trillion) unique keys is certainly a challenge, but the NSA is very good at what they do and they are extraordinarily equipped with computing power.

 

Three and a half trillion -- that's 13 digits. But what if the number of possibilities to try is a number over 600 digits long? Hmmm. If that's used for national security, that is good. Used for other purposes? Not so good.

 

Government involvement:

Marpex Inc. asks that appropriate bodies with national security interests within the U.S. government make themselves aware of our technology. Try it out. Try to break it. If you like it, under suitable arrangements we can provide technical notes, mentoring, and distance education to the right people. "Here is our technology. Here's how it works."

 

May 2019:

Marpex Inc. believes the need for its current offerings is keenly felt in government. Witness for example the Congressional Hearing on Quantum Technology by the House Science, Space and Technology Committee in October 2017. Throughout this decade articles about infringements upon U.S. national security by state-supported hackers have appeared all too frequently in the Wall Street Journal and ohter media. The United States is at war.

 

Selling to government is a challenge. In the mid-1980s Reteaco Inc. sold the FindIt CD-ROM search product to various government agencies. (FindIt was invented by Doug Lowry, the current president of Marpex Inc.) It was always a long sell. We got the contracts, but it took time to earn confidence and trust.

 

Unfortunately, we do not always have the luxury of extended time. In May 2019 the United States Patent and Trademark Office is scheduled to publish our patent application which is the foundation for Extreme Encryption™. Ideally, discussion between U.S. government security personnel and Marpex Inc. should get underway before then.

 

In the meantime, we are putting Extreme Encryption™ up for sale as a not-for-export security tool. Hey, we are trying to get your attention!

 

Contact us:

You may reach us through Colonel John Scott, Esq. (USAF, retired) at 740 275-4505 or colonelscott@airameva.com.

 

Site Map         Purchase

 

MarpX Privacy